Birds Talking
Birds talk for many reasons:  location, food, and predators.  If they are separated while foraging or after sleeping in distant locations, they call out to each other.  When one bird finds food for the day—or even the season—(s)he lets the flock know where to find it.  They warn each other of predators and rally the flock to the defense of a likely victim.  Male birds sing to woo a mate, mark their territory, and celebrate new life with song.  They warn of predators and rally the flock to the defense of a likely victim.  Male birds sing to woo a mate, mark their territory, and celebrate new life with song.  Parent birds (who hang around long enough for fledglings to try out their wings and hunting skills) bid the fledglings farewell with songs or last-minute tips for a good life.

Birds and humans communicate in varied ways, too.  You can read about the relationship between Freedom, an injured eagle, and Jeff, her trainer, as he dealt with cancer.

You can also hear samples of the birds below. Click on the photos  or bird name to hear their songs.



Red-Winged Blackbird          Anhinga          Grackle            Limpkin






Ferruginous Hawk and Golden Eagle photos by Marcia Specht

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